Requisitioned Auxiliary – Ingman

Ingman

 

Ingman 

when named Signe

 

Official Number:                        123188 

Laid down:

Builder:                                    A Rodger & Co. Port Glasgow

Pennant No:                            

Launched:                                11 September 1907

Into Service:                            1944

Out of service:                          1945

Fate:                                       Broken up 12 August 1945

 

Items of historic interest involving this ship: –

 

Background Data:  One of an additional group of ships requisitioned by the Admiralty during WW1 for use as a trasport and collier and then acquired by the Admiralty during WW2 to serve as a block ship

Career Data:

 

11 September 1907 launched by A Rodger & Co, Port Glasgow as Yard Nr: 403 named Helmsdale for Strath Steamship Co Ltd., Cardiff

October 1907 completed

10 March 1916 requisitioned by the Admiralty for deployment as an Expeditionary Force Transport – name unchanged – until 22 June 1916

30 January 1917 off the River Plate spoke to HMS MACEDONIA

10 February 1917 re-deployed as a wheat transport from the River Plate until 13 April 1917

14 April 1917 re-deployed as a collier until 30 May 1917

31 May 1917 re-deployed as a wheat transport from Canada until 13 July 1917

14 July 1917 re-deployed again as a collier

27 September 1917 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS BACCHANTE and also HMS MONTAGUE delivering stores

29 September 1917 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS AFRICA delivering stores

HMS Africa

HMS AFRICA

11 October 1917 & 12 October 1917 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS BRITANNIA supplying 206 tons of bunker coal

13 October 1917 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS BRITANNIA supplying 100 tons of bunker coal

30 October 1917 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS HIMALAYA supplying 574 tons of bunker coal

31 March 1918 & 1 April 1918 at Sierra Leone alongside HMS BACCHANTE delivering stores and supplying 214 tons of bunker coal

1 June 1918 sailed Dakar in convoy escorted by HMS MACEDONIA

6 November 1918 together with Steamship Emerald and escorted by HMS TENBY CASTLE sailed from Longhope to Peterhead

15 November 1918 at Deer Sound with HMS TENBY CASTLE

30 November 1918 at Ismid with a working party from HMS SEVERN onboard

1931 purchased by W H van der Zee, Istanbul and renamed Carol

1932 purchased by Euxine Shipping Co Ltd., London and renamed Carol Dorian

1938 purchased by Chas Strubin & Co Ltd., London and renamed Lake Hall Will

1939 purchased by A Inkapool E Jackobson & Others, Pamu – name unchanged

1940 purchased by Rederi A/B Ingman, Stockholm and renamed Signe

1941a renamed Ingman by her owners

1941b came under the auspices of MoWT with Chr. Salvesen & Co as Managers

1 October 1941 sailed Southend in unescorted convoy EC80 to Harwich arriving the same day then onto the River Tyne arriving 3 October 1941

8 October 1941 sailed the River Tyne to Methil arriving the next day

10 October 1941 sailed Methil in unescorted convoy EC83 to Loch Ewe arriving 13 October 1941 then independently to Sydney, Cape Breton arriving 3 November 1941

11 November 1941 sailed Sydney, Cape Breton independently to Clarke City arriving 13 November 1941

26 November 1941 sailed Clarke City independently to Sydney, Cape Breton arriving 28 November 1941

4 December 1941 sailed Sydney, Cape Breton in escorted convoy SC58 to the River Clyde arriving 20 December 1941

27 December 1941 sailed the River Clyde independently to Oban

1944 purchased by the Admiralty for use as a block ship

29 May 1944 arrived at Oban as one of 56 intended block ships gathered there

5 June 1944 arrived Poole Bay Anchorage along with other British and Allied ships from Oban

9 June 1944 scuttled as part of Gooseberry 3 off Gold Beach, Arromanches

12 August 1945 after raising was towed to Newport, Mon for demolition by J Cashmore Ltd.

 

Notes:

Was one of a group of nearly 60 elderly, uneconomic or damaged merchantmen plus 4 old warships who formed part of Operation Corncob – the vital Gooseberry Breakwaters which were sunk to provide protection against the weather in the English Channel for the ships supporting Operation Overlord – the D-Day Landings.