Requisitioned Auxiliary – North Wales (1916)

 

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Official Number:                      129056

Laid down:

Builder:                                  J.L. Thompson & Sons Ltd, North Sands, Sunderland

Pennant No:                           Y 3.859

Launched:                              1909

Into Service:                           28 November 1915

Out of service:                        26 October 1916

Fate:                                     1916 Torpedoed and sunk

 

Items of historic interest involving this ship: –

 

Background Data:  One of an additional group of ships requisitioned by the Admiralty just after WW1 to augment the ships of the RFA

 

Career Data:

27 October 1909 launched by J L Thompson & Sons Ltd., North Sands, Sunderland as Yard Nr: 469 named Wakefield for Century Shipping Co Ltd., (Harris & Dixon, Managers), London

December 1909 completed

24 February 1910 sailed Durban for Australian ports and to search for a missing steamer Waratah by sailing a zig zag course and around Crozet, Heard and Macdonald Islands

7 April 1910 had reached the Kergnelan Islands

24 June 1910 berthed at Melbourne – the missing steamer was not found

1915 purchased by North Wales Shipping Co Ltd., (H Roberts & Son, Managers), Newcastle and renamed North Wales

28 November 1915 requisitioned for Admiralty service as a Collier until 15 February 1916 and then from 16 June 1916 until 25 July 1916 when her deployment was changed to an Expeditionary Force transport to collect stores from Canada

26 October 1916 torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-69 off the Scilly Isles in position 49.20N 07.45W while on passage from Hull to Canada in ballast with the loss of all thirty of her crew who, although they had taken to the boats, were all drowned as there was a violent gale blowing at the time

 

Notes:

Had been purchased in 1015 as a replacement for an earlier ship of the same name and which had also been serving as a Collier when captured by the German light cruiser Dresden and sunk